I’m Not Ashamed Review

I decided to watch and review something different tonight; I normally don’t think highly of Christian movies and we can blame both God’s Not Dead movies for that. Christian movies aren’t bad, but it feels like the film makers are more interested in the message of the film (and probably advertising Christian pop music) rather than giving the film entertaining or a decent story.

I’m Not Ashamed is different from those movies in the sense that it is a autobiography about Rachel Scott. There is a strong presence of “message” in the film, but it actually has a place in the film. The film shows Rachel’s life from having divorced parents, living the usual ‘highschool teen life’ (smoking, drinking, flirting with guys), to her embracing a christian lifestyle, to struggling with her faith and practicing unconditional love and helping a youth named Nathan grow closer to God, all of this and more slowly leading up to her death.

I will say I am impressed with the film; it looked like and felt like the nineties from the clothing and the fads seen in the film to some of the music played (I’m guessing getting the rights to some of the music from the nineties was a little too pricey), they even had adult actors playing teenagers (a practice done frequently in the nineties as well, and I welcome it).

I would be lying if I said the film was perfect; some of the acting is off and there are moments where the film falls more into “here’s the message right infront of you in bold letters” rather than concentrating on telling the story. There is some inaccuracy to the time period too with dubstep being on the radio in some scenes. Scenes featuring Eric Harriss and Dylan Klebold’s actors are played as very creepy and disturbing to be honest, so props to their actors.

Concerning the controversy that Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold only targeted and executed Christians if they said yes to the belief in God it isn’t played up in the way that Rachel was a martyr and said “yes” in the sense that she was targeted solely because she was Christian. The scene still has it’s importance, but rather than treating that moment as Rachel’s moment to shine in her faith before being killed, it’s treated as a moment of shock and horror.

The main concentration concerning Rachel’s death is the events before and after her death. Her moments before involve making peace with a friend who had hurt her, and aiding a youth who’s parents were going through a divorce, and talking to a teacher about a drawing she was making that may or may not have predicted the events happening later that day. The aftermath involves how her loved ones were affected, and how she was remembered, and what her friends and loved ones learned from her.

The movie isn’t for everyone, if you want to watch it it’s fine, if you don’t want to watch it that is fine too.

I’m Not Ashamed is a Visible Pictures Film Production and Distributed by Pure Flix Entertainment.

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